Eliminate rent burden

Summary: Actual and projected aggregate disposable income for renters, and average disposable income/percent gain in disposable income per rent-burdened household, under a scenario in which no households are rent burdened (paying more than 30 percent of household income on gross rent). Disposable income is defined as household income minus gross rent. Data for 2017 represents a 2013-2017 average. All dollar values are in 2017 dollars.

Data Source(s): Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, IPUMS USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org, 2000 5% sample, 2015 and 2017 American Community Survey 5-year samples.

Universe: All renter-occupied households.

Methods: Aggregate disposable income, defined as household income minus gross rent, and average disposable income per rent burdened household was calculated by race/ethnicity and poverty level based on the actual survey data sources for each year and geography. Rent burden was defined as spending more than 30 percent of household income on gross rent, which includes contract rent and utilities. Aggregate disposable income and average disposable income per rent burdened household were then recalculated under a hypothetical scenario in which no households were rent burdened (i.e. in which gross rent was capped at 30 percent of household income for all households). Gains in aggregate (total) disposable income and in average disposable income per (formerly) rent burdened household under the hypothetical scenario of no rent burden were then derived. Values for 2000 and 2015 were adjusted for inflation to reflect 2017 dollars (using the CPI-U from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics). See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes: 

  • Latinos include people of Hispanic origin of any race and all other groups exclude people of Hispanic origin.
  • Demographic characteristics are based on those of the householder.
  • Data for 2015 and 2017 represent 2011-2015 and 2013-2017 averages, respectively.
  • All dollar values are in 2017 dollars.

Racial equity in income

Summary: Actual and projected income and gross domestic product (GDP) gains under a scenario of racial equity in income and employment for the population age 16 or older. Data for 2010 and 2017 represent five-year averages (e.g. 2013-2017).

Data Source(s): Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, IPUMS USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org, 2010 and 2017 American Community Survey 5-year samples.

Universe: All people age 16 or older.

Methods: Actual aggregate income and income per person age 16 or older was calculated by race/ethnicity and overall based on the actual survey data sources for each year and geography. Projected aggregate income and income per person was then calculated under a hypothetical scenario of racial equity income and employment under which age-adjusted average income levels (and income distributions) for each racial/ethnic group was the same as for non-Hispanic whites (in each Atlas geography and year). Gains in aggregate income and income per person age 16 or older was then calculated under the hypothetical scenario of racial equity income and employment, both in dollar terms and as a real (i.e. inflation-adjusted) percentage change. Values for 2010 were adjusted for inflation to reflect 2017 dollars (using the CPI-U from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics). For this analysis, the Asian or Pacific Islander population was dissaggregated and subgroups with higher average income, nationally, than the White population were assumed to experience no gains, while those with lower average incomes were assumed to experience gains. Data on actual GDP was matched in for geographies with available data, and gains in GDP were estimated by and applying the percentage increase in aggregate income (for all racial/ethnic groups combined) to actual GDP. GDP measures the dollar value of all goods and services produced in the region. See the methodology page for other relevant notes.

Notes: 

  • Latinos include people of Hispanic origin of any race and all other groups exclude people of Hispanic origin.
  • Data for 2010 and 2017 represent a 2006-2010 and 2013-2017 averages, respectively. 
  • All dollar values are in 2017 dollars. 
  • No data are available for cities for the GDP gains breakdown due to lack of information on city-level GDP.